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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
,000 people in the united states will wake up and sense something's wrong. they're more likely to be men than women, more likely to be people my age. but sometimes that unwelcome wakeup call arrives when you're young, when your career is just taking off. >> since you're obviously not a patient and i'm not getting anywhere, can you tell me where i can find a guy named lou who drives an ambulance, and i'll get out of your life. >> i'm lou. >> i was doing a film in florida and was partying pretty good, and was used to waking up not in great shape. but i woke up one morning, and my pinky was twitching, and it was just persistent. and i just... i realized that there was just nothing i could do to stop it. and i thought, is this like dts? who gets dts in a pinky? you know, with a lot of injury or a lot of catastrophic illness, it's like stepping off a curb and getting hit by a bus. but with parkinson's, it's like actually being stuck in the middle of the road while a bus is coming, and you can hear it, you have no idea how big it is, you have no idea how fast it's going, you have no idea whether it
in the united states of america and you're still seeing this-- a fully functional ecosystem, phenomenal pulses of life moving up these rivers. >> wild fish are important because they are beautiful. it's a beautiful species and they are a miracle of nature. but they're important because they are also the food source for everything from bears to caddisflies to eagles to killer whales. i mean, that's what feeds the food webs of the north pacific, wild salmon protein, pumped out of the ocean up into the rivers, delivered almost perfectly to every corner of the watershed. >> narrator: bristol bay's great sockeye salmon run is concentrated in several major river systems. each year, millions of fish swim up rivers like the nushagak or the kvichak to get to their spawning streams. it's here, north of lake iliamna, between two branches of that pristine watershed, that an extraordinary discovery has been made. for decades, several mining companies have been exploring the area, drilling core samples and mapping an area called the pebble deposit. this was in 2007. >> what we're doing here is in-fill drill
will happen if asd falls? >> there is definitely increasing worry in the united states administration about in whose hands these weapons are falling. >> these two stories on this special edition frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. >> narrator: guardian reporter ghaith abdul-ahad's journey into syria began five weeks ago on a supply route the rebels use to bring weapons from neighboring turkey. >> this is all liberated territory at the moment. >> narrator: the rebels are fighting to overthrow president bashar
. [flatline tone] james: we'll create a financial crisis of a size sufficient to destroy the united states of america. we have no choice. we will solve the problem. captioning made possible by friends of nci fisher: when we compare ucla and intermountain in terms of use of care, what we saw is that similar patients in that similar patients in los angeles were spending 60% more time in the hospital. they were having 75% more frequent office visits. and of course, if you're seeing more specialists, by golly, you're going to get a lot more diagnostic tests and minor procedures. that led to the question of are they getting much better health outcomes as a consequence of all this extra time in the hospital and all the additional procedures? and we found that they were not. feinberg: i would put our quality rankings against anybody, 'cause to me i think the most important quality ranking is patient satisfaction. if we look at that measure, we're the number one academic medical center in the united states. fisher: ucla is a very high-quality hospital, and i'd want to be taken care of there if i h
's the largest. we draw vendors and shoppers from all over the united states and overseas. and it's fun to walk it. how many places can you spend the whole day? it don't cost you any money. sebak: but vendors like karen johnson bring all sorts of unusual things to try and get you to spend money, and there are no price tags on any of her primitives. johnson: you gotta talk to me to get a price. you gotta be a people person, and that's the name of the game. sebak: the game here also includes texas chain saws because several guys, like mickey holt, are sculpting logs. holt: i'm also carrying on the tradition from my father. he started this, and i'm just wanting to keep it going. sebak: people buy his folk-art american icons made of local wood, especially cedar. holt: i don't really know when they leave here what they do with a lot of it, but as long as they leave here with it, i'm happy. sebak: there are happy vendors who trade all kinds of goods. the carlin brothers have been coming here for more than 20 years. well, we're twins. we're twins. we've known each other for about 63 years. john is a r
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)